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re boot — damaged rare whistles

Been a while since anything was posted and gathering a few thoughts as of late, thought to dribble on a little….

It always seemed poor judgement to be a collector and buy damaged whistles to us. However after years of collecting and studying them, there has been a change of thought. Inevitable I suppose.

Why say that ?? Because sometimes a rarity comes along that may never be seen again and where would be the closeup examination and learning be then ?? Perhaps that whistle would be the missing link in a chain of information vital to identifying another whistle or more !!!

Years ago we purchased a GSW with a porteous top. It was stamped the acme roller. However it was terribly smashed. The seller took it back and refunded the money. It was auctioned again and bought by an avid collector. Another one has not been seen since !!! RARE !!

Beyond the stamp, are whistles that may be damaged, but have important clues to identifying a manufacturer. Here at the Whistle Gallery reference collection we have a Lilly GSW with no mouthpiece. It has the only known Lilly stamp on it ( so far ) NOW however, is a benchmark for comparison to other whistles that may match !!

The MP1 from the Gilchrist collection and also is here at the Whistle Gallery reference collection has no diaphragm, but sets the bar for all MP collecting doesn't it ??

Our 6 tube Registered Porteous Wind Instrument in the reference collection is the only known example. However it has a crack in one tube — get rid of it and wait for another ??

 

What's the point of all this jabbering ?? Don't just pass on over those dented, broken, scratched whistles !!! There might be some important pieces there 🙂

Collecting whistles should be more than having the best. It is the deep and satisfying study, along with the discovery invovlved…..

TWG

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